Last edited by Nebei
Monday, February 3, 2020 | History

7 edition of Brochs of Scotland found in the catalog.

Brochs of Scotland

  • 336 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Shire Publications in Buckinghamshire U.K .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Scotland,
  • Scotland.
    • Subjects:
    • Brochs -- Scotland.,
    • Iron age -- Scotland.,
    • Fortification, Prehistoric -- Scotland.,
    • Scotland -- Antiquities.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 54-55) and index.

      StatementJ.N.G. Ritchie.
      SeriesShire archaeology book, Shire archaeology.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsGN780.22.G7 R57 1998
      The Physical Object
      Pagination56 p. :
      Number of Pages56
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6821075M
      ISBN 100747803897
      LC Control Number00300795

      In fact, like its predecessor, Broch 1 collapsed. In Orkney there are more than a dozen on the facing shores of Eynhallow Sound, and many at the exits and entrances of the great harbour of Scapa Flow. Researcher Euan MacKie has proposed a much smaller total for Scotland of In the midth century Scottish antiquaries called brochs 'burgs', after Old Norse borg, with the same meaning.

      Broch Interior from the Staircase Landing. Circular houses had been a distinctive feature of the British landscape for well over a thousand years before brochs appeared, at least since the Early Bronze Age, which began early in the second millennium BC. The entrance passage into Mousa is long, reflecting the enormous thickness of its walls. There are differences between the various areas in which brochs are found, with regard to position, dimensions and likely status. The main difficulty with this interpretation continues to be the potential source of structural timber, though bog and driftwood may have been plentiful sources.

      In the lowland parts of Scotland, in the south and east, most of these buildings were Brochs of Scotland book out of timber and consequently have not survived except as crop marks in aerial photographs. Circular houses had been a distinctive feature of the British landscape for well over a thousand years before brochs appeared, at least since the Early Bronze Age, which began early in the second millennium BC. The island itself is fascinating for those with an interest in birds, or wanting to see seals basking. Some brochs such as Dun Dornaigil and Culswick in Shetland have unusual triangular lintels above the entrance door. In the uplands of northern and western Scotland, timber was a scarce and very valuable resource so stone was used instead.


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Brochs of Scotland by J. N. G. Ritchie Download PDF Ebook

Most brochs have scarcements ledges which may have allowed the construction of a very sturdy wooden first floor first spotted by the antiquary George Low in Shetland inand excavations at Loch na Berie on the Isle of Lewis show signs of a further, second floor e.

Broch of Mousa

Brochs of Scotland book This building seems to have collapsed at some point and not much of it has survived. On average, the walls only survive to a few metres in height.

The new version, known as Broch 2, had a much thicker outer wall, ca. Radiocarbon evidence suggests that it was Brochs of Scotland book for nearly a thousand years, from the eighth century BC until the first couple of centuries AD. I put it in a plant that was healthy and the plant's health rapidly declined.

Brochs' close Brochs of Scotland book and profusion in many areas may indeed suggest that they had a primarily defensive or even offensive function. There are also a number of drawings and plans, which again perfectly complement the text.

The remaining fixtures and fittings, such as they are, give little help, for these largely date back to a later "wheel house" constructed within the walls of the broch, probably in the Pictish period. Brochs are tall stone towers 1 more than 10 metres high with well preserved structural features.

Broch Interior from the Staircase Landing. As a result, many mysteries remain. It is unclear whether, like many brochs, Mousa was the focus of a settlement that surrounded it or if it has always stood alone.

But most visitors find Mousa Broch an irresistible draw. Each one possesses stunning contemporary interior design; light, airy, spacious - yet incredibly cosy - they're the perfect place to embrace some Scottish-themed hygge all year round.

Brochs of Scotland by J. Also there is a spiral staircase winding Brochs of Scotland book between the inner and outer wall Brochs of Scotland book connecting the galleries.

The end of the broch building period seems to have come around AD — Location[ edit ] The broch is located on the western shore of the island of Mousa grid reference HU A winding, stone staircase, housed within the broch's double walls, led upwards to elevated floors and finally the top of the structure.

The entrance passage was 5. Often they are at key strategic points. There was no mistaking it. In Julywhen the pictures on this page were taken, the stone was replaced in Mousa Broch, approximately where it was taken from before its trip to America and back.

Meanwhile, the increasing number — albeit still pitifully few — of radiocarbon dates for the primary use of brochs as opposed to their later, secondary use still suggests that most of the towers were built in the 1st centuries BC and AD.

Inside was a main inner "chamber" from which smaller cells - either built into, or up against, the wall - branched off. There are differences between the various areas in which brochs are found, with regard to position, dimensions and likely status.

Structurally they are an incredible achievement; towers build using nothing more than dry stane dyking, able to withstand the Scottish weather for years! The entrance passage into Mousa is long, reflecting the enormous thickness of its walls. Why didn't the builders of these follow normal practice and recycle the readily available stone in the broch?

In December we received an email: "Hello. Although mainly concentrated in the northern Highlands and the Islands, a few examples occur in the Borders for example Edin's Hall Broch and Bow Castle Brochon the west coast of Dumfries and Gallowayand near Stirling.Oct 30,  · Scotland: A History from Earliest Times- Very accessible and easy to read look into the history of Scotland.

New Edinburgh History of Scotland- This is probably a difficult one for many people to get their hands on, but it's a really expansive History of Scotland through a series of volumes. You can see the distribution of brochs on the map below, and you can zoom in to find particular sites.

Clicking on a marker will reveal the name of the broch and a link to a page about it. Further below is an alphabetical list of the brochs in Scotland that have been added to the Stravaiging around Scotland ancient sites database.

Broch of Mousa (or Mousa Broch) is a preserved Iron Age broch or round tower. It is on the island of Mousa in Shetland, galisend.com is the tallest broch still standing and amongst the best-preserved prehistoric buildings in galisend.com is thought to have been constructed c.

BC, and is one of more than brochs built in galisend.comnates: 59°59′46″N 1°10′54″W / °N .You can see the distribution of brochs on the map below, and you can zoom in pdf find pdf sites. Clicking on a marker will reveal the name of the broch and a link to a page about it.

Further below is an alphabetical list of the brochs in Scotland that have been added to the Stravaiging around Scotland ancient sites database.scotland before the scots A few of the prehistoric sites were certainly occupied during the Dark Age-the Mote of Mark, Dunadd, and perhaps some crannogs in the south, many brochs and wheel-dwellings in Cited by: 3.The ebook of a sea eagle, perhaps.

A hush of leaves in ebook trees. Breaking waves down by the shore. That's all. Brochs are Iron Age roundhouses. There are several ruined remnants in the Scottish Highlands and Islands. The Brochs of Coigach are the real thing - but as cozy and luxurious and eco friendly as any accommodation you could think of.